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January 8, 2016

Review: MPOW Magneto

MPOW MagnetoBluetooth headphones are often a polarizing product with technology writers—the cheapest ones are usually junk, and even the higher-end ones suffer from poorer sound quality than a simple, wired pair. There’s also the added bulk, as the battery has to go somewhere. MPOW’s Magneto aims to counter these complaints by mixing a reasonable price with the newest Bluetooth technology in a stylish design…

January 13, 2015

Review: CoolStream Bluetooth Receiver

CoolStream Bluetooth ReceiverWe reviewed CoolStream’s Duo a few months ago and have enjoyed most of its features and usability, but were curious about some of the other models in the lineup. As such, we took a look at the original version of CoolStream’s Bluetooth receiver, which sells for about $10 less than the Duo at $30. Is it worth saving a few bucks?

October 22, 2014

Review: CoolStream Duo

CoolStream DuoAbout a year ago, we took a look at Auris’s freeDa, a small Bluetooth receiver that connected to most 30-pin Dock Connector-equipped accessories, allowing you to stream audio over Bluetooth. In the time since, there have been even more competitors (not that the freeDa was the first), one of which is the CoolStream Duo, a $40 music receiver that tries to do a few key things well.

January 29, 2014

Review: CoolStream Portable Bluetooth Speaker

CoolStream Portable Bluetooth SpeakerA few weeks ago, we took a look at the CoolStream Duo, a device that adds Bluetooth compatibility to just about any kind of speaker or amplifier. What if you don’t have existing audio hardware and want to make your iOS device or Mac a bit louder? This time, we had a chance to try out CoolStream’s Portable Bluetooth Speaker, a $50 gadget that seeks to provide a very inexpensive alternative to products like Jawbone’s Jambox, Beats Audio Pill, or Logitech’s Ultimate Ears family…

December 21, 2012

Review: Touchkraft Auris

AurisKickstarter projects are always a mixed bag, as you give an unknown vendor money in hopes of a project coming to fruition as described. On top of that, you’re not actually buying the product, but giving money to support its development, often in exchange for a final version as a “reward”. This model has worked well for many (just ask the guys at Studio Neat), and once products actually become successful, they can sustain an enterprise enough to be sold and manufactured via traditional means. Such is the case with Touchkraft’s Auris, a product I initially became interested when I was trying to find a better way to integrate my iPhone 4 in my car. After some changes from the initial deign, the Auris will now be available to the general public for $40…